Patrick Grady

The SNP has called for local people to join the campaign for Scotland to gain increased welfare powers so that more can be done to tackle child poverty in Glasgow North.

Figures published by End Child Poverty show that 29.44% of children in the Glasgow North constituency live in poverty after housing costs are taken into account.

The welfare provisions contained in the draft clauses published by the Westminster Government represent a significant watering down of what was promised by the Smith Commission. They do not enable the Scottish Parliament to create new benefit entitlements in devolved areas – and will also see the UK Government hold a veto over key devolved powers, including the ability to abolish the Bedroom Tax.

Leading campaign groups including Citizen’s Advice Scotland, the Poverty Alliance, SCVO and the STUC described the proposals as a missed opportunity.

Commenting, Patrick Grady, SNP Candidate for Glasgow North said: “The fact that nearly 30%of children in Glasgow North face the prospect is the clearest sign possible that the status quo is not working and more needs to be done to tackle child poverty.

“I don’t think it is acceptable that any child grows up in poverty and I would hope that people across the area agree that action needs to be taken.

“The Westminster Government has shown itself unwilling or unable to act to tackle the scourge of child poverty, so the Scottish Government must have the opportunity to step in.

“The welfare proposals put forward by the Westminster Government go nowhere near far enough, which is why so many charities have called for far greater welfare devolution.

“If elected in May, I will work with my fellow SNP MPs to secure the welfare powers Scotland needs so that we can do more to tackle child poverty than Westminster has ever achieved.

Notes:

The STUC’s response to Westminster’s draft devolution clauses

The Poverty Alliance’s response

Citizen Advice Scotland’s response 

The SCVO’s response

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